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The Discipline Armoury: Tip 21 – Pick Your Battles

Tip 1, Tip 2, Tip 3, Tip 4, Tip 5, Tip 6, Tip 7, Tip 8, Tip 9, Tip 10, Tip 11, Tip 12, Tip 13, Tip 14, Tip 15, Tip 16, Tip 17, Tip 18, Tip 19, Tip 20.

Pick Your Battles

It’s tough being a parent.  What’s even tougher are the expectations from others and from ourselves to be a “good” parent.  But what exactly defines a good parents?  Sometimes we’re so caught up with being a good parent that we assume that being a good parent is one whose children never fight, never cry, never make mistakes, never act out, etc.  Especially in front of our peers and our parents, we feel the intense pressure to have our children behave.

It’s perfectly normal for children to “misbehave” now and then.  They’re children and they have a long road of learning ahead of them.  If they didn’t explore, test boundaries, make mistakes and do other silly things, they wouldn’t be children.  In fact, even adults still do all those things…  So if you expect your children to be picture perfect, you’re going to be disappointed, angry, and frustrated for much of their growing up.

I thought this particular point from Pantley was a good reminder to learn when to cut your children some slack and let them be a child.  There are many rules to live by, but some are going to be more important than others.  Decide what’s really important to you and let the others go.  If you insist on fighting every battle, you’ll not only stress your children out, but you won’t be able to enjoy their company.

I like what Pantley says – as long as it isn’t something majoy, sometimes you just have to turn around and pretend you didn’t see that.

The Discipline Armoury: Tip 22 – Kind Words

Published by Shen-Li

SHEN-LI LEE is the author of “Brainchild: Secrets to Unlocking Your Child’s Potential”. She is also the founder of Figur8.net (a website on parenting, education, child development) and RightBrainChild.com (a website on Right Brain Education, cognitive development, and maximising potentials). In her spare time, she blogs on Forty, Fit & Fed, and Back to Basics.

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