Design a site like this with WordPress.com
Get started

Glenn Doman: How to Teach Your Baby – Part 4

Part 1, Part 2, Part 3.

The progress so far…

Gareth (4 months)

Math: Gareth is up to the 90s in the red dot cards and has done sums with the first forty dot cards.  He is starting to lose interest in the dot cards, although he is keenly attentive when I show him the sums.  It is true what Doman says about babies getting bored easily with old material and the importance of introducing new stuff.

After ten days of flashing simple math sums, you should start introducing subtraction.  Show three sets of three simple subtraction equations each day for the next ten days.

After ten days of flashing simple subtraction equations, introduce the concept of multiplication.  Again, show three sets of three simple multiplication equations each day for another ten days.

Once you have shown your baby 90 subtraction equations, it is time to introduce the concept of division.  As before, show three sets of three simple division equations for ten days.

Reading: The word cards interested Gareth for longer but over the last few days, I’ve noticed he gets distracted very easily.  Previously, I could get through all the flash cards without losing his attention.  These days, he can’t sit still.  He keeps squirming and trying to turn onto his tummy.

To keep his attention, I break it up – I never show more than five cards at a time.  In between sessions, I engage Gareth in other activities – peekaboo, little piggies, the tickle game, blowing raspberries, tummy time, etc.

We’ve moved onto “music instruments”, “fruit and vegetables”, and “farm animals and pets”.  Many of these are words of objects that Gareth has never seen before which could be the other reason why he isn’t interested.  The earlier categories were “parts of the body” and “members of the family” which introduced words that had some significance to him.  So to re-engage him, I started looking up pictures on the net and making a series of powerpoint slides to show Gareth what the objects look like.  The moment I did that, he started paying attention to the flash cards again.

Ideally, if you could show your baby the real object, I’m sure your baby’s interest in the flash cards will taken on a whole new level.

Gavin (3 years 2 months)

Math: I’ve started a new game with Gavin using the red dot cards.  Using only cards from 1 to 40, I’ll show him two cards and ask him to identify which card is which.  For instance, I’ll hold up 24 and 36 and ask him which one is 24.  If he points to the right card, he gets a smartie.  We were doing pretty well at one point but now I think he’s gone back to blind guessing because he gets even simple ones wrong.  I’ve also tried getting him to guess the quantity without counting – e.g.  “How many dots on this card?”  Again if he gets it right, he gets smarties.

I’m also using the Shichida Math flashcards I downloaded from the Shichida parenting resources website to encourage Gavin to learn additions.  One of the parents created addition charts using Thomas and Friends characters and it’s worked like a charm for Gavin.

Reading: After my little chat with Gavin about his Heguru classes and the importance of paying attention when the sensei is teaching, he seems to have taken a new interest for flash cards.  Instead of using the word flash cards from the Doman kit, I’m using the picture power point flash cards I created for Gareth.  So Gavin sees “word”, “picture”, “word”, “picture”, etc.  He seems to be responding well to it so far.  By responding well, I mean he’s paying attention and that’s good news after all my previous failed attempts to get Gavin interested to learn how to read.

Update: This post was written some years ago. Please see our updated notice on the Glenn Doman Program.

Published by Shen-Li

SHEN-LI LEE is the author of “Brainchild: Secrets to Unlocking Your Child’s Potential”. She is also the founder of Figur8.net (a website on parenting, education, child development) and RightBrainChild.com (a website on Right Brain Education, cognitive development, and maximising potentials). In her spare time, she blogs on Forty, Fit & Fed, and Back to Basics.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: